Juggling the elements of a good e-commerce product photo

Scrolling through e-commerce product photos is the online version of window shopping, so it’s important to make them as enticing as possible. After all, before you land a satisfied customer, you first need an interested shopper.

In this PickFu poll, the seller wanted to know which photo of a juggling set best demonstrates what’s included in the purchase or, more to the point — which one will get more clicks.

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DIY product photography: 5 dos and don’ts

Editor’s Note: Thanks to Peter Alessandria, photographer at GreatProductShots.com for the following guest post about DIY product photography.

1. DIY Product Photography: The camera

DON’T use your cellphone. Please. It’s not because I am a camera snob. The main problem with your cellphone camera is the lens. The wide angle can distort the view of your product. Since you spend thousands of dollars acquiring, designing, developing, prototyping and/or manufacturing your product, you want it to look its best, and the lens on the cellphone will not do it justice. It just can’t come close to the sharpness, clarity, and perspective you’d achieve with a decent camera. Plus, if you don’t have enough light, cellphone pictures look grainy.

DO get a nice camera. If you’re serious about selling and want to present your product in its best light, make the investment. You don’t need to spend more than $300-$400. Buy (or borrow) a great entry-level, interchangeable lens camera, such as a DSLR. I bought my 10-year-old niece a refurbished Canon Rebel SL-1 (including lens) from the Canon USA website for less than $300, and I could probably do 80% of my professional work with this camera if I had to. Afraid of using the wrong settings on your fancy new camera? Shoot in automatic mode, and the photos will still be stunning.

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